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Poppy and Oak

Meet the Maker: Meghan Wright of Figs and Feathers Farm

Meet the Maker: Meghan Wright of Figs and Feathers Farm

Meghan Wright from Figs and Feathers Farm was actually one of the first vendors I contacted about being included in our boxes. And she sat right next to me when I attended my first ever pop-up event in 2017.

Meghan lives in Sacramento, but has family in Grass Valley and it was those family members' garden that inspires many of her creations. And in fact led her to what Figs and Feathers Farm is today.

Scents are inspired by the Northern California flora, and she also harvests many of her ingredients from her family‘s property.

It was actually a family member’s suggestion that led her from ordinary soap-maker to community gathered and grown.

Meet the Maker: Nathanael Miller of the Air Plant Hub

Meet the Maker: Nathanael Miller of the Air Plant Hub

So while I love gardening and have a burgeoning collection of plants (my husband may call me a plant hoarder or crazy plant lady), I did not always have a green thumb.

I'm ashamed to admit it, but I've killed more than one succulent. But I think that's why I'm particularly drawn to air plants -- they are hearty folk.

And HOW COOL is it that they don't need soil to survive? Kind of blew my 8th grade plant biology brain.

Meet the Maker: Doneice Trotter of Pure Honey

Meet the Maker: Doneice Trotter of Pure Honey
Two of my favorite Davis Farmers Market ladies grace the entrance of the covered vendors section -- Dianne Madison of Yolo Press on the left, and Doneice Trotter of Pure Honey on the right. Yolo Press has the best olive oil, fruits, jams and gorgeous flowers. Doneice over at Pure Honey has a delightful assortment of raw honey, infused honey and caramel. And her stand is ALWAYS decorated with the most beautiful flowers from other Farmers Market vendor

Meet the Maker: Heather Wong, Owner of The Allspicery

Meet the Maker: Heather Wong, Owner of The Allspicery

The Allspicery was born out of Heather Wong's passion for cooking and travelling, and a realization of the scarcity of great quality and diverse spices in the Sacramento-area.The Allspicery is "Sacramento's one-stop spice shop" and features every day spices as well as uncommon, hard-to-find ingredients. They also offer unique spice blends, spice "kits" and in-house blended loose-leaf teas.

Without her love of travel, The Allspicery as we know it probably wouldn't exist.  But Heather didn't grow up traveling. She was afforded the opportunity to travel extensively while she obtained her MBA. Even before classes began, she was off to Peru. This kick-started her passion for travel and by the time she graduated with her MBA she had traveled to the Middle East, Greece, Africa and even studied abroad in Shanghai. 

Meet the Maker: Claire Tauzer of Sola Bee Farms

Meet the Maker:  Claire Tauzer of Sola Bee Farms

Claire is 1/2 of the family behind Sola Bee Farms, which produces the high-quality, sustainable and delicious local raw Sola Bee honey.

When I met Trevor in 2011, I was confused when he said he was a beekeeper. “For fun?” I asked him playfully. “Well yes, it is fun, but it’s also my passion and the family business.”

Meet the Maker: Akela Hudson-Miller of Akela Designs

Meet the Maker: Akela Hudson-Miller of Akela Designs
Akela possesses a green thumb, creative spirit and kind heart and all three of these shine through in her home, her craft and all of her interactions. 
Akela provides clients with products that are intentionally designed for living your best life, including succulents in concrete planters she makes with her husband Mark, crystals, hand-dyed and block printed textiles, among many other heirloom quality natural and handcrafted items.

Meet the Maker: Yolo Press

Meet the Maker, Dianne Madison, Yolo Press, Olive Oil, Davis Farmers Market

If you frequent the Davis Farmers Market than you've probably noticed the woman with the brimmed hat and infectious smile that is seemingly always at the corner stall on Saturday mornings.

The Madisons started off growing bulbs and cut flowers on their 22 acre farm, about 200 types, before moving to olives. Throughout this time, they've also grown a dozen or so varieties of citrus, including clementines, oranges, bergamot, and yuzu, as well as other produce such as quince, melons, and blackberries.